Darth Vader #14 Review

As the various strands of the 34-issue tapestry that is War of the Bounty Hunters start to come together, it only gets more stunning to look at, and this issue is no exception…


Reviewed by Nathan Harrison 28/7/21
DARTH VADER #14

Written by: Greg Pak

Art: Raffaele Ienco
Released: 21/07/21
Publisher: Marvel Comics

Darth Vader’s part in the so far very satisfying War of the Bounty Hunters event continues in this latest issue, with a shadowy plot from within the Empire itself finally revealed and Vader on a collision course with the rest of the major players in the crossover.

Following an unsuccessful assassination attempt on Vader, Administrator Moore returns to plotting with her council. The intrigue and conspiracy of the first half of this issue is nicely played out – Greg Pak’s dialogue is engrossing, especially in a short encounter between Moore and a suspicious Mas Amedda, which sees her get the upper hand in more ways than one. Shadows skirt around every panel and loom large in some against the muted greys and whites that make up the Empire’s favoured approach to décor. Artist Raffaele Ienco and colourist Jason Keith put every nook and cranny of each room to use, creating a foreboding sense of dread and unease.

The second half runs at an altogether different pace when Vader bursts back onto the scene, lightsaber blazing (after a brief appearance at the start of the issue). The greys are illuminated by vivid red and the imposing figure of Vader towers over it all in a couple of impressive splash pages. It speaks volumes about the true icon that Darth Vader is that he barely needs to say a word in his own comic to be the star of the show. That said, it can’t be an easy thing to do from a writing perspective and Pak handles it beautifully. He puts the right words in Vader’s mouth at the right time, and nothing more. When coupled with the imposing angles that Ienco depicts him from, the Dark Lord of the Sith remains just as terrifying as the first time he walked on screen in 1977.


VERDICT

As the various strands of the 34-issue tapestry that is War of the Bounty Hunters start to come together, it only gets more stunning to look at, and this issue is no exception. Seeing some of the events of issue 2 of the main mini-series from a different perspective makes for a nice touch, placing our hero (yes, we’re calling him that, it’s his comic – search your feelings, you know it to be true) right where he needs to be for the sparks to fly when the crossover truly kicks off over the coming month.


Review by Nathan Harrison 28/7/21

Star Wars: Jabba The Hutt #1 Review

One of Star Wars’ finest writers finally makes her debut at Marvel…

Review by Nathan Harrison 27/7/21

Written by: Justina Ireland

Art: Ibraim Roberson and Luca Pizarri
Released: 21/07/21

Publisher: Marvel Comics

Since its launch earlier this year, The High Republic has proven to be the most exciting new Star Wars expanded universe initiative in a long time – Justina Ireland has also proven to be one its most talented contributors. Her middle-grade novel, A Test of Courage, was emotionally complex, touching, and full of the heroism and derring-do that was promised when the new era was announced. It’s fantastic then to now see her name of the front of a Marvel comic as part of an altogether different era of Star Wars.

Ireland grabs the opportunity to show her range by the horns as we see her take on the darker underbelly of the Star Wars galaxy – her approach to iconic characters like the sinister, snivelling Bib Fortuna, Boba Fett and, of course, the titular mob slug Jabba the Hutt is spot on, while her introduction of new bounty hunter, Deva Lompop, a badass, double-crossing feathered lizard woman, is impactful. She stands out as the real star of this book and is bound to do so again in her upcoming appearances in further one-shots. Any character who can effortlessly belittle a character like Boba Fett with amusing results is not to be ignored!

The approach to the plot is also skilfully handled. What initially appears to be a straightforward tale of bounty hunters on the job soon turns out to be the first hint of the back-stabbing intrigue that we could see in future instalments of the War of the Bounty Hunters event. Deva Lompop is the driving force behind this, but Ireland also shows how easily Jabba can pull the rug from under the feet of those in thrall to him – as much as Deva seems to be the sort of person who does whatever the hell they want, everything ultimately comes back to Jabba and a debt he is owed. This chink in Deva’s armour and her potential vulnerability makes her even more compelling, rather than her simply being a likeable but one-sided scoundrel.

Art is provided by Ibraim Roberson for sequences set in the main timeline of War of the Bounty Hunters, and by Luca Pizarri for flashbacks. Their styles differ enormously so the effect can be jarring when the action shifts from one timeline to another. Roberson’s lines are defined and dynamic, with every known element instantly recognisable and all new elements standing out as beautifully done. Every panel hums with detail. However, Pizarri’s art is not quite as accomplished, and a lot of the main characters are drawn in a rather odd way, Jabba especially – he resembles a giant bullfrog at points rather than the slug-like creature anyone would recognise. The proportions of Boba Fett’s distinctive helmet and armour are also a little off. That said, Pizarri’s art has a cartoonish charm of its own, which works best during the more action-oriented sequences.


VERDICT

One of Star Wars’ finest writers finally makes her debut at Marvel and does a stellar job in both having a lot of fun with characters we know and introducing us to one we don’t who is bound to have a bigger and bigger impact as the event continues. While the art can sometimes lack accuracy and there are no particularly interesting layouts, it’s hard to ignore the quality of the whole page panels dotted throughout that bring a sense of scale and drama to this intriguing and engaging character-driven piece.


Review by Nathan Harrison 27/7/21


Throwback Review – Batman #445 – March 1990

Batman goes to Russia to help the Moscow police commissioner catch The NKVDemon, protégé of The KGBeast, who is out for revenge against those who betrayed his master…

Throwback Review – Batman #445 – March 1990
Review by Bryan Lomax

Writer: Marv Wolfman
Pencils: Jim Aparo

Inks:
Mike DeCarlo
Published by DC Comics March 1990

Batman goes to Russia to help the Moscow police commissioner catch The NKVDemon, protégé of The KGBeast, who is out for revenge against those who betrayed his master. The Demon works his way through a hit list of 10 people, much the same way as the KGBeast attempted to do in Gotham, only this time the hunting ground is his home turf in Russia. Can Batman accomplish what he once did in a city he is unfamiliar with?

‘Batman: Ten Nights of the Beast’, written by Jim Starlin in the late 80’s, is one of the seminal works of that decade. Marv Wolfman, no slouch when it comes to writing Batman, is given the task, two years later, of writing a direct sequel to that story. ‘When the Earth Dies! Chapter One: Red Square, Bloody Square’ is a pretty good starting point for it.


Wolfman bookends his story with two sequences. The opener sees Batman catching a villain in Gotham, his home turf, precisely because he knows every street, every alleyway, every sewer tunnel. The closing scene plays out similarly, only this time the villain escapes, precisely because Batman doesn’t know the layout of the city he’s in. In Moscow, the streets, alleyways and sewers belong to The Demon.

Batman #445

I love when stories are bookended. It’s a great device that writers can use to show us a change has happened, whether it be in a character’s personal growth, or in their circumstances. Here we see that Batman is Gotham. Gotham is as much a part of him as the air in his lungs. Without it, he cannot breathe, he cannot function as well as he once did. It gives his nemesis the edge.

That nemesis in question is probably the weakest element of the story, as The Demon is essentially just The Beast, only with a slightly different costume. I would rather they had just brought back The Beast himself. It would be much more fun to see a rematch with the iconic villain, where Batman no longer has the upper hand, instead of giving us a carbon copy in his place.

I always have a sense of nostalgia for Jim Aparo’s artwork. He’s not my favourite, but seeing his work always takes me back to my childhood, when I started reading comic books. It’s very much a golden era for me personally. But it’s great that both Aparo and inker, Mike DeCarlo, both return here, as it was the two of them that brought the ‘Ten Nights of the Beast’ storyline to life.


It must be said that this particular story is very dated as it assumes quite heavily on the audience’s knowledge of Russian politics of the time. And seeing Bruce just randomly bumping into Vicki Vale whilst dining out in Moscow is very quaint. Also, it seems to me that, if The Demon spent as much time doing stuff as he does gasbagging about a better Russia, he might actually stand a chance of achieving his goal. Some of his dialogue is stilted to say the least.

Batman #445


Verdict:

A great nostalgia trip for anyone who read comics as a child of the 80’s, but reading Jim Starlin’s ‘Ten Nights of the Beast’ before this is strongly recommended.


Review by Bryan Lomax, 24/07/21


Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #1 Review

‘Zero Point’ is a title which manages to get a lot of things right when so many could have gone wrong…

Review by Andy Flood

Written by:
Christos Gage

(Concept/Story Consultant: Donald Mustard)
Art:

Reilly Brown (Pencils), Nelson Faro DeCastro (Inks)

Colours: John Kalisz

Letters: Andworld Design

Released 20/4/21 Published By DC Comics

Epic Games are well known for working in crossovers and mashups with different areas of pop culture, having previously brought characters and elements from Star Wars, Marvel, DC and others to their game Fortnite.  To tie in with their latest in-game Batman appearance, DC launched Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point.  Aside from being a cool crossover project/event, each comic contains a unique code which allows for a free download of DC themed in-game goodies (this first being a Harley Quinn costume or ‘skin’).  If all 6 issues are purchased and redeemed, readers get the ‘Armoured Batman’ skin as an additional freebie.  All of this makes the limited run incredibly good value for money for Fortnite and DC fans.

Even were this not a factor, the comic itself has a great many things going for it.  The cover here is by Mikel Janín, whose art has graced numerous DC titles recently, not least of which have been some excellent covers on the current Action Comics arc.  This cover is immediately recognisable and sets a precedent in terms of style for the other covers to follow while also giving us a nice taster of the varied characters we are about to meet.

We open on a classic Batman scene: a dramatic rooftop meeting between Jim Gordon and Batman.  The Bat-signal in the cloudy night sky torn asunder by a strange, crackling rift.  The creators waste no time in dropping us straight into the action and within a few exciting panels, we are following Batman as he is thrust through this rift into… where?


This is one of many questions Batman faces as he wakes in this new world.  While the setting will be instantly familiar and thrilling for fans of the Fortnite game, it shows Batman in unfamiliar territory in more ways than one.  He scarcely has time to catch his breath before he is drawn into a series of seemingly random encounters.  Here we get to see Batman adapt, analyze and survive in a near literal maelstrom of chaos, despite having no memory of who he is and being unable to speak!

Christos Gage uses Batman’s inner monologue to great effect here, showing a clear understanding of what make the famous Dark Knight tick.  As we learn about this new world through Batman’s experiences, Gage cleverly introduces concepts from Fortnite which will delight fans of the game while also intriguing DC fans.  The tone of the writing is just right, and keeps us invested until the final page.

Artwork is bold, dynamic and colourful; just what is needed for this title.  The world of Fortnite is mercurial and, as such, can be hard to characterise but the art team have done a great job of nailing the style of both the game and the featured DC characters.


Verdict

‘Zero Point’ is a title which manages to get a lot of things right when so many could have gone wrong.  While there is some definite crossover between comic fans and players of Fortnite, it would have been easy to alienate either group.  This issue has plenty to please everyone and, if you’re lucky enough to be fans of both, you get a great comic to read and some very cool stuff for your game.  A cool read for all ages.

(Suggested ages 13+ by DC)


Review by Andy Flood, 20/7/21


Batman #110 Review

The pairing of artist, Jorge Jimenez, with colourist, Tomeu Morey, works wonders in bringing Tynion’s compelling study on societal fear to life…


Writer: James Tynion IV

Art: Jorge Jimenez (“The Cowardly Lot Part Five”) and Ricardo Lopez Ortiz (“Ghost-Maker Chapter 4”)

Colours: Tomeu Morey (“The Cowardly Lot Part Five”) and Romulo Fajardo Jr. (“Ghost-Maker Chapter 4”)

Published by DC Comics Released: 06/07/21

Review by Bryan Lomax


I stated in my review for the previous issue that I came into James Tynion’s story, “The Cowardly Lot”, somewhat late, but that I filled in the blanks with a quick search on the internet. Since then, I have gone back and read issue #106-#107, and I would highly recommend everyone doing the same if you haven’t already. Issue #107, in particular, really tells us who the character of Miracle Molly is, and what she stands for, in a way that makes me care for whether or not she will get out of the predicament we find her in by the end of issue #110. It also dives deep into the main themes of Tynion’s overarching story, adding more weight to events that happen in the current issue.

That theme is fear or, more to the point, societal fear. Tynion is asking, “where does that fear come from, why do we allow ourselves to be held prisoner by it and who stands to gain something from it?” The Scarecrow is obviously the perfect villain from Batman’s rogues gallery with which to explore that theme. But it’s still unclear as to where he fits into it all. Is he being used or is he the mastermind behind all that is happening in Gotham?

Then we have Simon Saint and his Peace Keeper program. Saint represents a threat that uses fear to achieve an agenda. And, while that agenda may ultimately be based on noble ideals, it’s execution reveals a complete lack of trust in the people it would supposedly serve. It is therefore no more than a vain attempt at making a play for power and control, marking Saint out as a true villain.

We have former Arkham security guard, Sean Mahoney, who takes up the frontman position of Saint’s Peace Keeper force. He represents much of what so many people today fear, particularly in the US, as their country becomes more and more divided, seemingly heading towards totalitarianism. If Gotham was to embrace Saint’s Peace Keepers then it might as well change its name to Mega City One.

The scary thing about Miracle Molly and the Unsanity Collective is that everything they say about the definitions of “sane” and “insane” and who gets to decide upon them makes for quite a convincing argument. The greatest system of control, Tynion argues, is fear and we are all caught up in it. But those who do not fear anything, such as Ghost-Maker, are labelled as psychopaths, even though, as this story shows, they might be the only ones we can count on to release us from our own prisons of fear.

These are the things I find myself thinking about as I read this issue, which is all down to the excellent story telling from Tynion. And once again I have to say that I’m really loving the artwork by Jorge Jaminez and the beautifully rich colours by Tomeu Morey.

I’m still not quite as keen on the artwork for the “Ghost-Maker” origin story, now in its fourth chapter, which kind of feels like Tynion is setting up a rogues gallery for his creation, that he can then use as a starting point, should the character get his own series. Beyond that there’s not much to complain about and I eagerly await the next issue.


Verdict –

The pairing of artist, Jorge Jimenez, with colourist, Tomeu Morey, works wonders in bringing Tynion’s compelling study on societal fear to life.


Review by Bryan Lomax, 17/07/21


Star Wars: War Of The Bounty Hunters #2 Review

While the stakes are high for some of everybody’s favourite Star Wars characters, the issue is still packed chock-full of humour…


Written by:
Charles Soule
Art:
Luke Ross
Released: 14/07/21

Publisher:
Marvel Comics

Review by Nathan Harrison


One of the joys of being a Star Wars fan is that if an enjoyable character is created to appear only once on screen, chances are that those who want to see more of them will not be disappointed by what the expanded universe has to offer. This can lead to some of the biggest surprises across all of the franchise – the cliffhanger at the end of issue 1 of this limited series was a prime example, with Qi’ra (played by Emilia Clarke in Solo: A Star Wars Story) revealed to be the mastermind behind the theft of Han Solo and the new leader of Crimson Dawn having been their slave just a few years prior. And now she’s ready to sell the helpless, carbonite-encased rebel to the highest bidder at ‘The Scoundrel’s Ball’!

In the first few pages, Charles Soule shows that he is a master at packing in as much important information into just a minute or so’s reading time, without drifting into clunky exposition. He is aided beautifully by Luke Ross’ art and layout – wide, cinematic panels are packed with creatures from across the galaxy as Soule introduces us to all the criminals looking to snap up access to the galaxy’s most notorious smuggler.




While the stakes are high for some of everybody’s favourite Star Wars characters, the issue is still packed chock-full of humour – even the bounty hunter fight of the century between Boba Fett and Bossk is shot through with uniquely grim slapstick, enhanced by Neeraj Menon’s bright pastel colours, which continue to bring something really quite special to this book. Such an encounter could have easily taken up a whole issue, but the few pages here are beautifully done before Soule returns to the meat of the story.

As if Luke Ross didn’t have enough of a challenge on his hands with the early panels at the ball, Soule then starts to bring a lot of the threads and main characters of this epic event together, with Ross given the responsibility of bringing to life a gamut of iconic faces new and old. Unsurprisingly, it’s an occasion he rises to meet fantastically – each figure is drawn with painstaking accuracy but with a hint of cartoonish charm that compliments the fun approach Soule has taken with this book so far.


VERDICT

The War of the Bounty Hunters event well and truly gets underway this issue, with almost all the major players assuming their positions by the final page – whatever happens next, it looks as though some of the most fun (and potentially quite bonkers) Star Wars comics since their relaunch with Marvel all the way back in 2015 are on their way.


Review by Nathan Harrison 18/7/21


Harley Quinn #1 Review

Phillips does an incredible job of showing us a complicated, multi-faceted character, that has too often been played for laughs at the expense of some real depth. Here, she is angry, smart, compassionate, violent and, yes, funny…

Writer: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Riley Rossmo
Colours: Ivan Plascencia
Letters: Deron Bennett
Released: 23/03/21

Published by DC Comics

Reviewed By Bryan Lomax


The first story, “Welcome Home”, in Harley Quinn’s new solo series, from writer Stephanie Phillips, offers a fresh take on the character. With the recent movie, Birds of Prey and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn, a film which I actually really loved, having been helmed by a female director, it’s nice to see DC Comics following suit, allowing one of their most beloved female characters to be tackled from a female perspective.

Phillips does an incredible job of showing us a complicated, multi-faceted character, that has too often been played for laughs at the expense of some real depth. Here, she is angry, smart, compassionate, violent and, yes, funny.

There isn’t much story to speak of within these pages if I’m being honest. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing at this point. Phillips just takes the time to set the scene, show us where Harley is at in her life right now, and give us a sense of her place within Batman’s world going forward.

She is a character trying to make amends for her past sins and, as Harley herself points out during one specific moment, “Everyone does love a good transformation story”. And seeing such a flawed character striving to earn redemption is definitely the kind of story I am drawn to.

The artwork by Riley Rossmo will take some getting used to for me. It’s not the kind of work that I usually go for, with exaggerated features, which often feel as though you have entered somebody’s fever dream. However, it is entirely in keeping with the character of such an often unreliable narrator as Harley.

We are introduced to a character, named Kevin, who could very well go on to become Harley’s side-kick. I can certainly see the potential there and there is something endearing about Harley taking someone under her wing who may just be crazier than she is.


Verdict:

A suitably chaotic first issue in this solo series for fan favorite Harley Quinn.


Review by Bryan Lomax, 16/07/21


The Swamp Thing #4 Review

Grasping hands, plant cells and dark ambiguity fill the cover of ‘My Green Amaranthine Part 2’.  It’s a wonderfully atmospheric piece of art which mirrors the tone of the comic within…


The Swamp Thing #4 Reviewer: Andy Flood

Written by: Ram V

Art: Mike Perkins
Colours: Mike Spicer
Letters: Aditya Bidikar



Released 2/6/21Published by DC Comics

Grasping hands, plant cells and dark ambiguity fill the cover of ‘My Green Amaranthine Part 2’.  It’s a wonderfully atmospheric piece of art which mirrors the tone of the comic within.

We are led further through The Green by guides both fair and shady as the sense of mystery and revelation deepens.  There is a feeling of experiencing this strange journey of discovery alongside Levi and Jennifer as they come to understand more about this elemental realm and the peril within.  With characters appearing which will be familiar to both long time Swamp Thing fans and fans of DC as a whole, this is an interesting an exciting chapter.

It’s a story on a cosmic scale and I am astounded at the ease with which Ram V guides us through it.  Themes of collective consciousness, memory and the interconnectedness of living things are explored.  The dialogue and narration are convincing and enthralling throughout, and Ram V deftly uses these as tools to inform and entertain us.  It would be so easy to become lost in The Green along with the protagonists and yet we emerge thrilled and enlightened.

‘The line work is detailed and inventive while the colours are lush and immersive’

A big part of translating such epic concepts and events to the page falls to the artists, and once again, the team of Mike Perkins and Mike Spicer exceed expectations.  Each page gives us art which manages to not only recall echoes of Swamp Thing past but also surprise us with visuals which are new and fresh.  The line work is detailed and inventive while the colours are lush and immersive.  There are so many details and subtle colour cues here that it really invites the reader to linger and enjoy the spectacle.

Further immersion is provided by Aditya Bidikar’s lettering, which not only uses cleverly differentiated bubbles but also brings us a brilliant way to represent a fading voice.  His work on this series so far has really enhanced the story and our experience of it.

As this issue draws to a close, we have not only a teaser of things to come but are also left with a sense of having enjoyed something rather special.  It’s sometimes easy to overlook the elements comprising a comic and just take it all in.  And that’s great; but maybe, just maybe, stay a while… look a little closer… read between the lines… you’ll be happy you did.


Verdict

The Swamp Thing #4 continues to impress and amaze.  The creators are doing something incredible here and I hope people sit up and take notice.  It’s a comic to pore over; to show your friends so you can talk about it afterward; a comic to treasure.  Track it down, find a good place to read, and get ready for one memorable ride.


(Recommended by DC for readers 13+)

Reviewed by Andy Flood – 13/7/21


James Bond: Agent of Spectre #1 Review

James Bond: Agents of Spectre #1 is a great starting point for anyone, you don’t need to have the greatest knowledge of the James Bond world…


James Bond: Agent of Spectre #1 Review by Angus Woods


Written by: Christos Gage

Art: Luca Casalanguida

Released 3/4/21 Published by Dynamite

James Bond #1 is the perfect cup of tea for a James Bond fan in the long wait for No Time To Die. I myself thoroughly enjoyed this issue and it only left me wanting more to be quite honest.

The cover art by Steve Epting is one of the nicest covers I have seen in a long time, the black and white cover with the dark red blood really sets the stage for what is behind it. This is definitely one of my favorite covers recently.

The story devised by Christos Gage is utterly action-packed and you see yourself getting drawn into the issue very quickly. Christos writing is something to behold, he moves the story on at a good pace while also spending enough time to develop the story around 007. We are introduced to Blofeld in this issue, Bond is set the objective to kill him, and in doing so we are shown a beautiful montage of panels of Blofeld and Bond brawling it out. In this series Blofeld is a rather big guy who doesn’t hurt easily and the way Christos has written him adds to the level of respect Bond and Blofeld mutually have for each other, which is a different angle for the Blofeld and Bond relationship and I find rather refreshing.

Although the art style chosen by Luca Casalanguida is not my all-time favorite, and is rather sketchy artwork, it does give a refreshing break from the cartoon/animated artwork of a mainstream comic book and is far from awful. If this is your kind of art in a book, both the writing and colours compliment it very well and you will enjoy a refreshing read away from Marvel and DC.


In conclusion, James Bond: Agents of Spectre #1 is a great starting point for anyone, you don’t need to have the greatest knowledge of the James Bond world or be a massive comic fan, it reads like an Ian Fleming book and draws you in like a 007 movie and I highly recommend you pick this up.


Reviewed by Angus Woods 11/07/2021


The Amazing Spider-man #70 Review

Spencer’s final story is about to explode into the stratosphere and this issue is drenched in pure anticipation and fast paced, action packed artwork that is sure to entice readers into Spidey’s biggest threat yet…


The Amazing Spider-man #70Review by Leo Brocklehurst

Written by: Nick Spencer

Art by: Federico Vicentini


Released 7/7/21 Published by Marvel Comics

“And answers? Well, we’re ALL looking for those, aren’t we? (…) But we may not like what we find when we GET them”.

Spider-man’s latest fixture is a great book that excites and hypes you up for the next big event of Spider-ness. A perfect prelude with raising stakes and a theme of questions running throughout.

The writing by Nick Spencer is able to set the stage for a storyline that feels like it might actually shake things up for once. Hopefully rectifying Spencer’s biggest flaw in his Spidey run: the lack of change. As you read it, it flows great and is fine for fun little Spidey stories that you can relax to but in the big picture, not much has changed. Sure there have been SOME for sure as it’s almost impossible to go 70 issues without changing anything but it has been an incredibly slow rise. Beginning with Sinister war however, things are looking up for Spidey readers and this issue is evidence.

As I said before, the theme of this issue is one of questions. MJ wants answers for Carlie (who is locked away in a cell with Harry Osborn (double bracket whaaat???) in a place we’re not even sure is on earth at this rate) , Carlie wants answers for Harry, Doc Ock wants answers about things taken from him and Spider-man wants answers on just what is going on??
The lizard and Curt Connors have been separated and the sinister six have vanished, escalating worries around the city and on top of ALL of this, it looks like Mysterio is back in town!!

The art in this issue, done by Federico Vicentini has almost a smooth, manga like style and flow whilst also looking messy and rough. I thought it accompanied the fast pace of the book extremely well; rushing to the big BANG to kick it all off and I can’t wait to see how beat up Spidey gets this time around.


Verdict:

Spencer’s final story is about to explode into the stratosphere and this issue is drenched in pure anticipation and fast paced, action packed artwork that is sure to entice readers into Spidey’s biggest threat yet.

8/10


Reviewed by Leo Brocklehurst on 9/7/21